Sentinel View v1.2.0: Better Check Your Passwords Tonight

With all the data we collect (as you can read in details in my previous article) the challenge is not to figure out what to do with the data, but the implementation of the idea itself. When we have access to so many passwords, it was only a matter of time to implement some kind of search for passwords that show up in incident records. And this one wasn’t so complex either. We bring to you today a Password Checker with brand new release v1.2.0 of Sentinel View.

Dynamic Firewall View in Sentinel View v1.1.0

You may have read some of our previous articles about Turris Sentinel and it’s companion – Sentinel View. Today we would like to share yet another cool feature that is available and that gives you even better feel how dangerous the internet really is.

Sentinel View 1.0 Release

Highly anticipated release of Sentinel Viev have come to life. It wasn’t a breeze due to issues with time-expensive database queries. The upgrade was conducted in spirit of optimizing the ever-growing database. Although Martin Prudek, the author of major changes is not part of the team, his effort left everlasting mark on the project. Another former colleague, Vojta Myslivec, have been unforgettable helping hand in regard to the database end and it’s improvement.

Turris OS 5.2 has been released

In the newly released Turris OS 5.2 version, you can find Overview after logging in to web interface reForis. It provides you easily recognized status about the activated services for automatic updates, data collection, dynamic firewall, test for Internet connectivity, speed test using Netmetr.cz, and added list of OpenVPN clients to any OpenVPN servers. Based on the community feedback, we prepared for you the requested missing features in reForis. Since this release, you can see the Storage tab, the possibility of doing a factory reset from the UI and adding a registration token to use Honeypot as a Service. Some of these features were missing from an old web interface or from the previous major version of Turris OS.

New Turris OS 5.0 version is out

We have released a new version of Turris OS 5.0. It is based on top of OpenWrt 19.07.3 with our patches and feed for all of Turris routers. In this article, we will go through new features and changes, including experimental migration from the Turris OS 3.x version. We will mention a few obstacles we faced during the development and introduce several features you can expect in future releases.

WireGuard on Turris

Now more then ever, people connect and work remotely. Everybody uses some kind of VPN, at least in the tech world. The new, trendy and cool way of doing VPNs is Wireguard. Everybody speaks about it and since March it is finally a part of Linux kernel. Its advantages are that it is setup in more straight forward way than alternatives and that it is blazingly fast.

Fun we had at AT&T hackathon

At the end of November last year awesome crew from AT&T organized a hackathon about various aspects of smart technology. They have a long tradition in organizing those and they are really good at it. We spoke at various conferences with them and they asked us whether we would be interested in joining as we have interesting hardware to lend contestants and also developers skilled in various areas that could help the attendees to overcome various issues. We jumped on board right a way!

Mozilla is solving IoT issues using Turris Omnia

IoT

IoT or Internet of Things is a real hype nowadays. Everybody is talking about it and everybody is doing it. Especially companies producing various electronic devices like light bulbs, electric switches, thermometers, scales, CCTV and such. Everything can be smart – even your toilet. All you need to do is to measure something or replace the manual switch with electronic one and connect it to Bluetooth, Zigbee, ZWave or even WiFi and you have a smart device that people will pay a hefty price for. But there are some issues (apart from the obvious one that not all those devices make sense).

A behind-the-scenes look at the production of Turris MOX cases

From the beginning of the development of the Turris MOX router, we have faced a difficult task –how to assemble the modular system so that it does not collapse during handling and, at the same time, make it as user friendly as possible when the user deciders to disassemble and reassemble it. You will be able to find out whether we have accomplished this task or not in the coming weeks when the first MOXes in cases arrive to their users. In the following article, I would like to introduce you to the development and production of the final case of our new product.

A behind-the-scenes look at the production of Turris MOX prototypes

The new product of the Turris router series is called MOX and it is conceived as a modular system. A number of additional modules can be connected to the basic CPU of the MOX A module, allowing the users to use only the features they need, without the peripherals they have no use for yet. And, of course, they will be able to extend the entire router in the future as necessary. Modules marked with letters A through E are now in the prototype stage, i.e. launching, testing of individual functions, but also fine-tuning the production process and preparation for serial production of thousands of devices. In this article, you will find out what prototype production looks like.